Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1891)



Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was born to an aristocratic family in 1864 at alibi in Languedoc. At 18 Lautrec began training at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. There he learned his foundations in academic art. By the 1880ís Lauterc began creating more expressive graphic works for French newspapers. During the 1890ís he went on to create over thirty posters. Like Chret, he also used color lithography and experimented with metals like zinc to create his posters. He used bold lines and color to convey the glamorous decade in Paris. Lauterc used striking silhouettes and caricature-like forms. His posters became a recognized art form in Paris and other Provincial towns. Lauterc died a young man stricken with bone disease throughout most of his life. He was one of Franceís best known poster designer and graphic artist Below are some examples of his work.





La Goulue, 1891. This poster was designed for an appearance of the dancer La Goulue (the Glutton) at the variety theater Moulin Rouge. It is a lithograph in four colors and measures 170 x 120 cm.























Divan Japonais, 1892-93. This poster was designed for an appearance by the singer Yvette Guilbert, shown on stage at the cabaret Divan Japonais. It is a lithograph in four colors and measures 79 x 59 cm.

















Aristide Bruant, 1892. This poster was for an appearance by the singer and entertainer Aristide Bruant at the cafe-concert Ambassadeurs. It is a six color lithograph and measures 150 x 100 cm.























La Revue Blanche, 1895. This poster was for the magazine La Revue Blanche, showing Misia Natanson, wife of one of the periodicals publishers. It is a lithograph in four colors and measures 130 x 95 cm.