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Model of ancient Rome.

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Model of ancient Rome.
3rd c Roman Roman Imperial Architecture

ROMAN Anonymous (753 BCE - 476) Primary
c 250
3rd c
Roman Imperial
Rome. Italy.
Brussels. Musées Royaux d'Art et d'Histoire.
Athens50.rom02003
During the rule of Vespasian's successors the Flavians, Rome was at its height. This model of the city shows how it looked in the 2nd century. Rome was the original megalopolis, with a population of approximately a million people. Rome owed its size and its power to the fact that it was the political and administrative center of the vast Roman Empire. From all over the empire, which extended from Egypt and Mesopotamia into Europe through France, Germany and the Balkans, people flocked to Rome, looking for opportunities in government and in trade. At the end of the first century Juvenal complained that the city was overrun by foreigners, especially Greeks and Syrians. The city was a mixture of large public spaces and very crowded private ones. The great wealth of the empire allowed the emperors to construct not only temples and public fora, but also huge constructions dedicated to pleasure and entertainment of the masses. On the left is the hippodrome or race track, on the far right is one of the great public baths, and in the center is the vast coliseum, all of which we will look at in some detail. Private spaces were much more constricted than were public ones. Most people lived in apartment buildings, which were known as INSULA. The use of concrete made such multistory constructions possible. Rome had many such tenement houses, and they multiplied particularly during the 1st century CE as the central city of the Empire expanded rapidly. Some of the insulas covered an entire city block, with shops located on the lower floors and apartments of different sizes above. In Rome the height of such multistory dwellings was limited to sixty feet, which meant that they could have been as tall as eight stories. Few of the apartments contained kitchens, for most of the food was brought in already prepared. Does some of this sound vaguely familiar? The writer Juvenal described the crowds of Rome: "In front of us as we hurry on, a tide of human beings stops the way; the mass that follows behind presses on our backs in dense concourse; one man pokes me with an elbow, another with a hard pole; one knocks a beam against my head, another a ten gallon cask. My legs are coated with thick mud...." During the rule of Vespasian's successors the Flavians, Rome was at its height. This model of the city shows how it looked in the 2nd century. Rome was the original megalopolis, with a population of approximately a million people. Rome owed its size and its power to the fact that it was the political and administrative center of the vast Roman Empire. From all over the empire, which extended from Egypt and Mesopotamia into Europe through France, Germany and the Balkans, people flocked to Rome, looking for opportunities in government and in trade. At the end of the first century Juvenal complained that the city was overrun by foreigners, especially Greeks and Syrians. The city was a mixture of large public spaces and very crowded private ones. The great wealth of the empire allowed the emperors to construct not only temples and public fora, but also huge constructions dedicated to pleasure and entertainment of the masses. On the left is the hippodrome or race track, on the far right is one of the great public baths, and in the center is the vast coliseum, all of which we will look at in some detail. Private spaces were much more constricted than were public ones. Most people lived in apartment buildings, which were known as INSULA. The use of concrete made such multistory constructions possible. Rome had many such tenement houses, and they multiplied particularly during the 1st century CE as the central city of the Empire expanded rapidly. Some of the insulas covered an entire city block, with shops located on the lower floors and apartments of different sizes above. In Rome the height of such multistory dwellings was limited to sixty feet, which meant that they could have been as tall as eight stories. Few of the apartments contained kitchens, for most of the food was brought in already prepared. Does some of this sound vaguely familiar? The writer Juvenal described the crowds of Rome: "In front of us as we hurry on, a tide of human beings stops the way; the mass that follows behind presses on our backs in dense concourse; one man pokes me with an elbow, another with a hard pole; one knocks a beam against my head, another a ten gallon cask. My legs are coated with thick mud...."

Caption: | Model of Rome | Roman Imperial | Roman

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