Skip to Content

Web of Art 15: African Interactions

Showing 1 of 1


  FILTER RESULTS

TL Seated Ruler TR Chief's Throne BL Throne Sultan Njoya BR. Chief's Throne
19th-20th c African (West) TL. Akan TR. Chokwe BL. Mun BR. Hehe Sculpture

AKAN PEOPLES Anonymous (active 15th c - 19th c) Primary
AKAN PEOPLES Anonymous (active 15th c - 19th c)
AKAN PEOPLES Anonymous (active 15th c - 19th c)
AKAN PEOPLES Anonymous (active 15th c - 19th c)
c. 1800-1950
19th-20th c
Stone
Carved
TL. Akan TR. Chokwe BL. Mun BR. Hehe
statuette
TL. Ghana. TR.Angola BL. Cameroons BR. Tanzania
TL. New York. Met. TR Booklyn Mus. BL Berlin Nat. Mus. BR. Washington African Mu
African58.afr02c33
The four images shown here represent the modification of the form of the stool under the influence of the westerners. In the upper left we see an Akan ruler seated on a traditional Golden Stool which symbolized his power. According to legend, the Golden Stool had been brought down by the priest Anokye from the sky, who laid it in the lap of Osei Tutu, the founder of the Akan state in the early 17th century. The Golden Stool represented the spirit as well as the power of the entire nation, and the people believed that their well being depended upon its safety. The other images show the influence of the Europeans on this traditional symbol of authority, which is found throughout Africa. On the upper left a European high backed chair has been substituted for the traditional stool, and the chair is decorated with bronze attachment. The image on the lower right maintains the connection of woman with stool found in many groups, but in a most creative way, she becomes the back of the chair or throne of honor. The stool from the Cameroons shown on the lower left is a combination of the traditional stool form and the high back of the European chair. This sumptuous object, which belonged to the Bamun sultan Njoya, is decorated with European beads, which most likely came from Venice. Sultan Njoya, who ruled at the beginning of the 20th century, was a great patron of the arts and used them both as diplomatic gifts and to impress his people. This richly decorated throne was used at assemblies of his council and at judicial gatherings. It is decorated with the traditional double headed snake, symbolizing the power of the ruler, but in addition, he has adopted the power of the European gun, which is held by his two guards. You will see a detail of this throne on the next image.

Caption: TL. AKAN TR. CHOKWE BL. MUN BR. HEHE| TL Seated Ruler TR Chief's Throne BL Throne Sultan Njoya BR. Chief's Throne | c. 1800-1950 | West African |
<!--#4DEVAL gsFunc_SortRecords ([Portfolios]Port_Name; ">")--> : ## Error # 54

Portfolio List Click a portfolio name to view all the objects in that portfolio
This object is a member of the following portfolios:


Your current search criteria is: Portfolio is "Web of Art 15: African Interactions" and [Object]Creator Display Name is "AKAN PEOPLES Anonymous".